Tarantino Talks ‘Once Upon A Time In Hollywood’ Soundtrack At GRAMMY Museum

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Quentin Tarantino nestled into a focused discussion on Wednesday at the GRAMMY Museum in downtown Los Angeles to articulate his autobiographical relationship with the music in his latest film, Once Upon A Time in Hollywood.

The moderated question and answer session unearthed a trove of Tarantino musical trivia for diehard disciples to digest: His first live show? A “big Halloween concert” in his native Southern California from legendary radio deejay Wolfman Jack in the ’70s. A well-documented vinyl hound, Tarantino’s first albums consisted of Partridge Family records and the Superfly soundtrack. (The latter being the first he bought with his own money.)

Unlike any of his previous eight films, the events of Once Upon A Time in Hollywood take place during Tarantino’s childhood. In his case, like most of ours, those dawning years where the first music you love sticks to your soul forever.

Throughout the night’s discussion, Tarantino–in his customarily frenetic eloquence–unpacked the pop-culture of his boyhood and reflected on the process of curating the late-’60s sounds for the film’s exceptional soundtrack (with emphasis on period rock band Paul Revere & the Raiders, whose lead singer, Mark Lindsay, joined him on stage for a lengthy segment).

Below are excerpts from Wednesday night’s discussion:

On the personal significance of the GRAMMYs: “Well I haven’t won one yet, so it would mean a lot more to me if I could look at one on my shelf. But I’ve been nominated a few times. Unfortunately, the bane of my existence, is—the category I always get nominated for, or could be eligible for—is soundtrack albums that are put together with other songs. Well, it so just happens that category didn’t exist the year of Pulp Fiction. And so every time I get nominated, it’s always some other zeitgeisty-thing that is like for sure gonna win… so whatever. It’d be nice to have that.”

Tarantino and his films were nominated for Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media in 2004 (Kill Bill: Vol. 1), 2005 (Kill Bill: Vol. 2), 2010 (Inglorious Basterds) and 2014 for Django Unchained. The category originated in2000

On the song accompanying a film’s opening credits: “If you’re gonna get anything right, you gotta get the opening credits right, you know? The opening credit song, that is the theme of your movie whether you like it or not. So I can honestly say, when I do my little deep-sea-diving-thing looking for stuff, once I get a good opening credit song—once I go, “OK, this will be in the opening credits of the movie’—that’s 50 percent of me doing the movie… [And] for a long time I was like, ‘Well, any song that had been used in a movie that was used well, well then you can’t even touch it because that movie owns it.’ [Then I was like], ‘Ahh! F**k that! I’ll do it better than those guys! Let it be great, I’ll do it better! I’ll put mine against theirs any day!’ But it’s like… when I watch other people’s [stuff], when I see a song and it works perfectly with the right kind of scene, then, yeah, whenever I hear that song I think of that movie.”

On his first memories of music: “Back around the time where this movie takes place, 1969… I was between six and seven. It’s probably around ’67, ’68, ’69, that I’m paying attention to what’s going on the radio. And there was a lot of music shows on TV. So I think my two first songs that I knew from the radio that I loved—and I’m sure it was ’67, ’68—was the Batman theme… I loved Batman back then, so I totally knew that song very well; and Barry Sadler’s ‘The Ballad of the Green Berets.’ Those are songs that a six-or-seven-year-old boy would really, really love. But I also remember, like ‘Foggy Mountain Breakdown‘ with the theme to Bonnie and Clyde… I absolutely loved ‘Snoopy vs. the Red Baron,’ which we put a little bit in the movie—I could sing the whole song.

But I think when it comes to movies back then, for sure the artist that I knew that would’ve done the music for a movie that I absolutely knew who they were and they played the songs all the time, was Simon & Garfunkel with The Graduate. One of the reasons I put ‘Mrs. Robinson’ in the movie was, that [mimics ‘do-do-do’ refrain], it was just [ubiquitous] for like a two-year period. It was just constantly playing away. The way people talk about The Beatles playing all the time, that was playing all the time.”

On the numerous radio “airchecks” in Once Upon A Time in Hollywood: “With getting these KHJ recordings, listening to them and hearing all the commercials and the deejay patter, hearing the different songs: It was such a soundscape; it just was such a thing; it brought me right back. It really made me remember about just how constant the radio was. Yes, it was in your car, but you were in your car a lot. And so you’re hearing it all the time. But I remember we’d go home and turn on the radio when got home—you’d turn on the TV or turn on the radio… I remember KHJ would always have wacky contests or something, where [you’d] pick up the phone, ‘KHJ plays the number one hits,’ or something. I was a kid. I wanted to win their contests. I’m answering the phone, ‘KHJ plays the number one hits.’ Only to find out later we weren’t even in the book. KHJ’s never gonna call us. But hearing those shows was a revelation. Hearing the deejays was great. But also the ads. The ads start blowing you away. And it made me realize, all of a sudden—we’d play it a lot in the production office—and some different young people that work in the production office would come up and go, ‘I like the ads as much as the songs.’ Especially if there was a like a jingle. And the more you listen to ’em, the more you realize, ‘Oh, no: This was cultivated sound, in a big way.’ So like, I’m sure these jingles were done for KHJ and KHJ-like stations. So they were meant to compete with the music on the air.”

On emphasizing the music of Paul Revere & the Raiders in Once Upon A Time in Hollywood: “I was always a big fan of Paul Revere & the Raiders, and naturally if we’re talking about 1969… I’m between six-and-seven around that time period. Well that’s exactly the kind of band that’s gonna knock my little socks off—of course. Even more than The Beatles, at that age, my favorite bands are gonna be Paul Revere & the Raiders and The Monkees. They were the ones that were speaking to me and talking to me. And they were funny and they were cool and they were comedy. And because of their connection with Dick Clark, they were on TV all the time. And there was a lot of TV to be on: there’s The Ed Sullivan Show; and there’s Hullaballoo and there’s Shindig!well, stuff like Hullaballoo and Shindig! is before my time, but they were on those shows. And they were on KHJ… I was a huge fan. [But] I stopped listening to them for a while, and then—what was the deal?—when I started reconnecting with Paul Revere was sometime around the time of Inglorious Basterds or something. I’d go to used record stores and go through the bins, and it’s one of those records like, ’20 Golden Hits of the ’60s,’-kinda thing. And on it, it had two songs I never heard of before: One was Simon & Garfunkel’s ‘We Got a [Groovy] Thing Goin,’ and the other was Paul Revere’s ‘[Ooh Poo Pah Doo]…’ But it was this wild, bluesy-jazz improv riff or something. And it was really cool! And I wasn’t quite used to hearing their more bluesy-funk-kinda stuff. So I found myself going to used record stores and picking up some different Paul Revere albums… I had an assistant at the time, she’s this young gal, and she liked it. So I ended up making her a special Paul Revere & the Raiders cassette tape that she started listening to. And her enthusiasm got me even more enthusiastic about it, and so I kinda reacquainted myself with Mark and the boys’ music.

And then in doing [Once Upon A Time in Hollywood], there’s all these real life connections to the story… the big connection, amongst all the other things is, before Sharon [Tate] and Roman [Polanski] lived at Cielo Drive, before that Terry Melcher lived with Candice Bergen at Cielo Drive. Terry Melcher was the Columbia Records boy wonder that came up with idea for Paul Revere & the Raiders–it was his brainchild (unintelligible)… But before he (50: 50) had Candice Bergen living at the Cielo Drive house, it was Mark Lindsey and Terry Melcher who lived at that house. They are the reason that Charles Manson even knew who Terry Melcher was, is because he was the boy wonder that did Paul Revere & the Raiders for Columbia Records. And so, with the idea of him being so interwoven into the fabric of that mythology, the history of both Los Angeles and those murders and that whole area in the canyons, it had to be that they would be a part of the movie.”

The wide release of the Standard and Deluxe Vinyl editions of the “Once Upon A Time in Hollywood” soundtrack hits stores Oct.25

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Quentin Tarantino nestled into a focused conversation on Wednesday at the GRAMMY Museum in downtown Los Angeles to articulate his autobiographical relationship with the music in his latest movie, As Soon As Upon A Time in Hollywood

The moderated concern and response session discovered a trove of Tarantino musical trivia for diehard disciples to digest: His very first live show? A” big Halloween show” in his native Southern California from legendary radio deejay Wolfman Jack in the’70 s. A well-documented vinyl hound, Tarantino’s first albums consisted of Partridge Household records and the Superfly soundtrack.( The latter being the very first he purchased with his own money.)

Unlike any of his previous 8 movies, the occasions of As Soon As Upon A Time in Hollywood happen throughout Tarantino’s youth. In his case, like most of ours, those dawning years where the very first music you love adhere to your soul permanently.

Throughout the night’s conversation, Tarantino– in his usually frenetic eloquence– unpacked the pop-culture of his boyhood and assessed the procedure of curating the late-’60 s noises for the movie’s exceptional soundtrack (with focus on period rock band Paul Revere & the Raiders, whose diva, Mark Lindsay , joined him on stage for a prolonged sector).

Below are excerpts from Wednesday night’s conversation:

On the personal significance of the GRAMMYs: ” Well I haven’t won one yet , so it would imply a lot more to me if I could take a look at one on my shelf. But I have actually been nominated a few times. Regrettably, the bane of my presence, is– the classification I always get chosen for, or could be eligible for– is soundtrack albums that are assembled with other tunes. Well, it so simply takes place that category didn’t exist the year of Pulp Fiction. And so each time I get chosen, it’s constantly some other zeitgeisty-thing that resembles for sure gon na win … so whatever. It ‘d be good to have that.”

Tarantino and his films were nominated for Finest Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media in2004( Kill Bill: Vol. 1 ),2005( Kill Costs: Vol. 2),2010( Inglorious Basterds) and2014for Django Unchained. The category come from2000

On the song accompanying a movie’s opening credits: ” If you’re gon na get anything right, you got ta get the opening credits right, you know? The opening credit song, that is the style of your movie whether you like it or not. So I can honestly state, when I do my little deep-sea-diving-thing trying to find things, as soon as I get a good opening credit tune– once I go,” OK, this will be in the opening credits of the motion picture’– that’s50 percent of me doing the film … & lsqb; And & rsqb; for a very long time I was like,’ Well, any song that had actually been used in a film that was used well, well then you can’t even touch it because that movie owns it.’ & lsqb; Then I resembled & rsqb;,’ Ahh! F ** k that! I’ll do it much better than those guys! Let it be terrific, I’ll do it much better! I’ll put my own versus theirs any day!’ However it’s like … when I see other people’s & lsqb; stuff & rsqb;, when I see a song and it works perfectly with the ideal sort of scene, then, yeah, whenever I hear that song I think about that film. “

On his first memories of music: “Back around the time where this film takes place,1969 … I was in between six and 7. It’s probably around’67, ’68,’69, that I’m taking note of what’s going on the radio. And there was a great deal of music reveals on TELEVISION. So I think my 2 very first songs that I knew from the radio that I loved– and I make certain it was’67,’68– was theBatman style … I loved Batman at that time, so I absolutely knew that tune extremely well; and Barry Sadler’s ‘ The Ballad of the Green Berets‘ Those are songs that a six-or-seven-year-old boy would really, really love. However I also remember, like‘ Foggy Mountain Breakdown ‘ with the style to Bonnie and Clyde … I definitely liked‘ Snoopy vs. the Red Baron,’ which we put a bit in the motion picture– I might sing the entire tune.

But I think when it comes to films back then, for sure the artist that I understood that would’ve done the music for a motion picture that I absolutely understood who they were and they played the songs all the time, was Simon & Garfunkel with The Graduate One of the reasons I put’ Mrs. Robinson’ in the film was, that & lsqb; mimics ‘do-do-do’ refrain & rsqb;, it was simply & lsqb; common & rsqb; for like a two-year duration. It was simply constantly playing away. The way individuals talk about The Beatles playing all the time, that was playing all the time

On the many radio” airchecks “in Once Upon A Time in Hollywood: ” With getting these KHJ recordings, listening to them and hearing all the commercials and the deejay patter, hearing the various songs: It was such a soundscape; it simply was such a thing; it brought me right back It really made me keep in mind about simply how constant the radio was. Yes, it remained in your automobile, but you remained in your vehiclea lot Therefore you’re hearing all of it the time. But I remember we ‘d go home and turn on the radio when got home– you ‘d switch on the TELEVISION or turn on the radio … I keep in mind KHJ would always have wacky contests or something, where & lsqb; you ‘d & rsqb; get the phone,’ KHJ plays the number one strikes,’ or something. I was a kid. I wished to win their contests. I’m addressing the phone,’ KHJ plays the top strikes‘ Just to find out later on we weren’t even in the book. KHJ’s never gon na call us. However hearing those shows was a discovery. Hearing the deejays was fantastic. However likewise the ads. The advertisements start blowing you away. And it made me understand, all of a sudden– we ‘d play it a lot in the production office– and some different young individuals that work in the production workplace would come up and go,’ I like the advertisements as much as the songs.’ Especially if there was a like a jingle. And the more you listen to ’em, the more you understand,’ Oh, no: This was cultivated sound, in a big way.’ So like, I’m sure these jingles were done for KHJ and KHJ-like stations. So they were indicated to take on the music on the air.”

On stressing the music of Paul Revere & the Raiders in When Upon A Time in Hollywood :” I was constantly a huge fan of Paul Revere & the Raiders, and naturally if we’re discussing1969… I’m in between six-and-seven around that time period. Well that’s exactly the sort of band that’s gon na knock my little socks off– naturally. Even more than The Beatles, at that age, my favorite bands are gon na be Paul Revere & the Raiders and The Monkees. They were the ones that were talking to me and speaking with me. And they were amusing and they were cool and they were comedy. And because of their connection with Dick Clark, they were on TV all the time And there was a great deal of TELEVISION to be on: there’s The Ed Sullivan Show; and there’s Hullaballoo and there’s Function! well, things likeHullaballoo and Shindig! is before my time, however they were on those shows. And they were on KHJ … I was a big fan. & lsqb; However & rsqb; I stopped listening to them for a while, and after that– what was the deal?– when I started reconnecting with Paul Revere was at some point around the time of Inglorious Basterds or something. I ‘d go to used record stores and go through the bins, and it is among those records like,’20 Golden Hits of the’60s, ‘- kinda thing. And on it, it had two tunes I never became aware of before: One was Simon & Garfunkel’s’ We Got a & lsqb; Groovy & rsqb; Thing Goin, ‘and the other was Paul Revere’s’ & lsqb;-LRB- ********************************************) Ooh Poo Pah Doo & rsqb; …’ But it was this wild, bluesy-jazz improv riff or something. And it was truly cool! And I wasn’t rather utilized to hearing their more bluesy-funk-kinda things. So I found myself going to utilized record shops and picking up some various Paul Revere albums … I had an assistant at the time, she’s this young gal, and she liked it. So I wound up making her an unique Paul Revere & the Raiders cassette tape that she started listening to. And her interest got me much more enthusiastic about it, therefore I kinda reacquainted myself with Mark and the kids’ music.

And After That in doing & lsqb;-LRB- ***************************) When Upon A Time in Hollywood& rsqb;, there’s all these reality connections to the story … the huge connection, among all the other things is, prior to Sharon & lsqb; Tate & rsqb; and Roman & lsqb; Polanski & rsqb; lived at Cielo Drive, before that Terry Melcher lived with Candice Bergen at Cielo Drive. Terry Melcher was the Columbia Records boy wonder that came up with idea for Paul Revere & the Raiders– it was his creation (muddled) … But prior to he (50: 50) had Candice Bergen living at the Cielo Drive home, it was Mark Lindsey and Terry Melcher who lived at that home. They are the reason that Charles Manson even knew who Terry Melcher was, is due to the fact that he was the boy marvel that did Paul Revere & the Raiders for Columbia Records. Therefore, with the idea of him being so interwoven into the fabric of that mythology, the history of both Los Angeles and those murders which whole area in the canyons, it needed to be that they would belong of the film.”

The large release of the Requirement and Deluxe Vinyl editions of the “As soon as Upon A Time in Hollywood” soundtrack hits shops Oct.25

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″Once Upon A Time in Hollywood″ writer and director Quentin Tarantino.

As Soon As Upon A Time In Hollywood: An Evening With Quentin Tarantino & Buddies at The GRAMMY Museum, Los Angeles.

Thanks To the Recording Academy ™/ photo by Rebecca Sapp, Getty Images ©

Quentin Tarantino nestled into a focused discussion on Wednesday at the GRAMMY Museum in downtown Los Angeles to articulate his autobiographical relationship with the music in his latest film, As Soon As Upon A Time in Hollywood

The moderated question and answer session unearthed a chest of Tarantino musical trivia for diehard disciples to digest: His first live program? A “big Halloween show” in his native Southern California from legendary radio deejay Wolfman Jack in the’70 s. A well-documented vinyl hound, Tarantino’s very first albums consisted of Partridge Household records and the Superfly soundtrack.( The latter being the first he bought with his own cash.)

Unlike any of his previous 8 movies, the occasions of As Soon As Upon A Time in Hollywood occur throughout Tarantino’s childhood.
In his case, like most of ours, those dawning years where the first music you love sticks to your soul permanently.

Throughout the night’s discussion, Tarantino– in his customarily mad eloquence– unloaded the pop-culture of his boyhood and assessed the procedure of curating the late -‘ 60 s sounds for the movie’s remarkable soundtrack (with emphasis on period rock band Paul Revere & the Raiders , whose lead singer, Mark Lindsay , joined him on stage for a prolonged section).

Below are excerpts from Wednesday night’s conversation:

On the personal significance of the GRAMMYs: “Well I haven’t won one yet , so it would mean a lot more to me if I might look at one on my rack. However I have actually been nominated a couple of times. Unfortunately, the bane of my presence, is– the classification I always get nominated for, or could be eligible for– is soundtrack albums that are put together with other songs. Well, it so simply takes place that classification didn’t exist the year of Pulp Fiction Therefore every time I get nominated, it’s constantly some other zeitgeisty-thing that is like for sure gon na win … so whatever. It ‘d be great to have that.”

Tarantino and his films were nominated for Finest Collection Soundtrack for Visual Media in 2004 (Eliminate Bill: Vol. 1), 2005 (Kill Costs: Vol. 2), 2010 (Inglorious Basterds) and 2014 for Django Unchained. The classification come from in2000

On the song accompanying a film’s opening credits: “If you’re gon na get anything right, you got ta get the opening credits right, you know? The opening credit tune, that is the style of your movie whether you like it or not. So I can honestly say, when I do my little deep-sea-diving-thing trying to find things, when I get a good opening credit tune– once I go, “OK, this will be in the opening credits of the motion picture’– that’s 50 percent of me doing the movie … [And] for a long time I resembled, ‘Well, any tune that had actually been utilized in a movie that was utilized well, well then you can’t even touch it because that film owns it.’ [Then I was like], ‘Ahh! F ** k that! I’ll do it better than those men! Let it be fantastic, I’ll do it much better! I’ll put mine versus theirs any day!’ But it’s like … when I watch other individuals’s [stuff], when I see a tune and it works perfectly with the ideal type of scene, then, yeah, whenever I hear that tune I think of that movie.”

On his very first memories of music: “Back around the time where this film happens, 1969 … I was in between six and seven. It’s most likely around’ 67,’ 68,’ 69, that I’m taking notice of what’s going on the radio. And there was a lot of music reveals on TELEVISION. So I think my two very first songs that I knew from the radio that I loved– and I’m sure it was’ 67,’ 68– was the Batman style … I loved Batman back then, so I absolutely knew that song very well; and Barry Sadler’s ‘The Ballad of the Green Berets .’ Those are songs that a six-or-seven-year-old young boy would truly, really love. However I also keep in mind, like ‘Foggy Mountain Breakdown ‘ with the style to Bonnie and Clyde … I definitely liked ‘Snoopy vs. the Red Baron ,’ which we put a bit in the motion picture– I could sing the entire song.

However I believe when it comes to motion pictures back then, for sure the artist that I understood that would’ve done the music for a motion picture that I absolutely knew who they were and they played the songs all the time, was Simon & Garfunkel with The Graduate Among the reasons I put ‘Mrs. Robinson’ in the motion picture was, that [mimics ‘do-do-do’ refrain], it was just [ubiquitous] for like a two-year period. It was simply continuously playing away. The method individuals talk about The Beatles playing all the time, that was playing all the time .”

On the many radio” airchecks ” in When Upon A Time in Hollywood : “With getting these KHJ recordings, listening to them and hearing all the commercials and the deejay patter, hearing the various tunes: It was such a soundscape; it just was such a thing ; it brought me right back It actually made me remember about simply how continuous the radio was. Yes, it remained in your vehicle, however you remained in your vehicle a lot Therefore you’re hearing everything the time. But I remember we ‘d go home and switch on the radio when got house– you ‘d turn on the TV or switch on the radio … I remember KHJ would constantly have goofy contests or something, where [you’d] get the phone,’ KHJ plays the number one hits ,’ or something. I was a kid. I wanted to win their contests. I’m addressing the phone,’ KHJ plays the number one hits .’ Just to find out later on we weren’t even in the book. KHJ’s never gon na call us. However hearing those shows was a discovery. Hearing the deejays was fantastic. But likewise the advertisements. The advertisements start blowing you away. And it made me realize, all of a sudden– we ‘d play it a lot in the production workplace– and some different youths that operate in the production workplace would come up and go,’ I like the advertisements as much as the tunes.’ Particularly if there was a like a jingle. And the more you listen to ’em, the more you recognize, ‘Oh, no: This was cultivated sound, in a big way.’ So like, I make certain these jingles were done for KHJ and KHJ-like stations. So they were indicated to contend with the music on the air.”

On stressing the music of Paul Revere & the Raiders in As Soon As Upon A Time in Hollywood : “I was constantly a big fan of Paul Revere & the Raiders, and naturally if we’re speaking about 1969 … I’m in between six-and-seven around that time duration. Well that’s precisely the sort of band that’s gon na knock my little socks off– naturally. A lot more than The Beatles, at that age, my favorite bands are gon na be Paul Revere & the Raiders and The Monkees. They were the ones that were speaking to me and talking with me. And they were amusing and they were cool and they were comedy. And due to the fact that of their connection with Cock Clark, they were on TELEVISION all the time And there was a great deal of TV to be on: there’s The Ed Sullivan Program ; and there’s Hullaballoo and there’s Shindig! well, stuff like Hullaballoo and Function! is before my time, however they were on those shows. And they were on KHJ … I was a big fan. [But] I stopped listening to them for a while, and then– what was the offer?– when I started reconnecting with Paul Revere was at some point around the time of Inglorious Basterds or something. I ‘d go to used record stores and go through the bins, and it’s one of those records like,’ 20 Golden Hits of the’ 60 s,’ – kinda thing. And on it, it had 2 songs I never ever heard of before: One was Simon & Garfunkel’s’ We Got a [Groovy] Thing Goin ,’ and the other was Paul Revere’s’ [Ooh Poo Pah Doo] …’ However it was this wild, bluesy-jazz improv riff or something. And it was truly cool! And I wasn’t quite utilized to hearing their more bluesy-funk-kinda things. So I found myself going to used record shops and getting some various Paul Revere albums … I had an assistant at the time, she’s this young gal, and she liked it. So I wound up making her a special Paul Revere & the Raiders cassette tape that she started listening to. And her interest got me much more passionate about it, therefore I kinda reacquainted myself with Mark and the boys’ music.

And then in doing [Once Upon A Time in Hollywood], there’s all these reality connections to the story … the huge connection, among all the other things is, prior to Sharon [Tate] and Roman [Polanski] lived at Cielo Drive , before that Terry Melcher lived with Candice Bergen at Cielo Drive. Terry Melcher was the Columbia Records kid marvel that came up with idea for Paul Revere & the Raiders– it was his brainchild (unintelligible) … But prior to he (50: 50) had Candice Bergen living at the Cielo Drive home, it was Mark Lindsey and Terry Melcher who lived at that home. They are the factor that Charles Manson even knew who Terry Melcher was, is because he was the kid marvel that did Paul Revere & the Raiders for Columbia Records. Therefore, with the idea of him being so interwoven into the fabric of that mythology, the history of both Los Angeles and those murders and that entire location in the canyons, it had to be that they would be a part of the movie.”

The broad release of the Requirement and Deluxe Vinyl editions of the “As soon as Upon A Time in Hollywood” soundtrack strikes shops Oct.25

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